Imagining the Apocalypse

Event Date: 
19 Oct 2019

The Courtauld Institute of Art

 

 

Shaped by different religious traditions, the apocalypse has been called upon throughout history to articulate collective anxieties, act as a warning, or a yearned-for spiritual salvation. These contradictory and competing aims behind imagining the end of the world in specific cultural moments make it a fertile ground for analysis. This conference will ask: what are the politics of picturing annihilation, from the early Christian Church to climate change today? This call for papers welcomes submissions from all historical periods and geographic regions. From medieval mosaics to Hieronymus Bosh, Albrecht Dürer’s woodcut The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1498) to Keith Piper’s critique of Thatcherite-era racism, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1984) – culture has played a crucial role in imagining the apocalypse. If we scratch under the surface, doomsday is often evoked time and time again to articulate a worldview of ‘us’ versus ‘them’: the desire to re-establish a sense of mastery over those perceived to be threatening. This interdisciplinary conference welcomes proposals that consider imaginative representations of the end of the world from antiquity to the present day. Please send a short bio with proposals of no more than 300 words for 20-minute papers to edwin.coomasaru@courtauld.ac.uk by 14th January 2019.

Submission date for papers: 
14 Jan 2019